Chapter 11. The Effect of Microstructure on the High-Temperature Deformation Behavior of Sintered Silicon Nitride

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. J. Whalen,
  2. C. J. Gadsaska and
  3. R. D. Silvers

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch11

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Whalen, P. J., Gadsaska, C. J. and Silvers, R. D. (1990) The Effect of Microstructure on the High-Temperature Deformation Behavior of Sintered Silicon Nitride, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch11

Author Information

  1. Allied-Signal Inc. Research and Technology Center Morristown, NJ 07960

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374924

Online ISBN: 9780470313008

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Keywords:

  • silicon nitride;
  • cavitation;
  • deformation;
  • microstructures;
  • monolithic

Summary

The high-temperature deformation behavior of two sintered silicon nitride materials with identical compositions but different microstructures was studied using both compression and 4-pt. bend flexure analyses. Both materials contained acicular grain structures but differed in scale by a factor of about five. Deformation rates in compression were up to 30 times slower for the coarse-grained material at stresses of 207–345 MPa in the temperature range 1275°−1350°C. Similar behavior was seen in flexure results at 1050°−1275°C. The predominant mechanism of deformation in compression was grain-boundary sliding, accompanied by cavitation, while significant crack growth took place on the tensile surface of bars stressed in flexure.