Chapter 18. Creep of SiC Whisker-Reinforced Alumina under Compressive Loading

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. David S. Liu and
  2. Azar Parvizi-Majidi

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch18

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Liu, D. S. and Parvizi-Majidi, A. (1990) Creep of SiC Whisker-Reinforced Alumina under Compressive Loading, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch18

Author Information

  1. Center for Composite Materials and The Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374924

Online ISBN: 9780470313008

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Keywords:

  • ilicon-carbide;
  • alumina composite;
  • dimensions;
  • acumulated;
  • aluminum oxide

Summary

Compression creep tests have been performed in air on a silicon-carbide reinforced alumina composite containing 7.5%, 15%, and 25% by weight whiskers. Specimen strains were monitored throughout each test via optical extensometry and subsequently verified by directly measuring specimen dimensions after testing. Selected specimens were fractured at room temperature while others were characterized with transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the dominant modes of deformation under these experimental conditions. Stress-strain rate relationships were determined as well as the activation energies for the observed deformation. Most of the deformation was accumulated during steady-state creep; little primary creep was observed in most cases. Calculated stress exponents suggest that a diffusional type of mechanism controls the compressive creep behavior.