Chapter 19. Reaction-Based Processing Methods for Ceramics and Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. J. S. Haggerty and
  2. Y. -M. Chiang

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch19

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Haggerty, J. S. and Chiang, Y. .-M. (1990) Reaction-Based Processing Methods for Ceramics and Composites, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch19

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374924

Online ISBN: 9780470313008

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Keywords:

  • monoliths;
  • capabilities;
  • condensed-phase reactions;
  • potential;
  • ceramics

Summary

Reaction-forming methods successfully applied to ceramic monoliths and composites having a wide range of compositions are reviewed. Net-shape capabilities and the potential for high purity are the principal advantages of this processing route for both monoliths and composites. Recent results with several different processing techniques demonstrate that superior, often unique, properties can be achieved with these materials if correct microstructural features are achieved. The absence of shrinkage is particularly important for composites because sintering aids are not needed to facilitate particle and reinforcement rearrangements during densification. The absence of sintering aids can allow both monoliths and composites to retain improved properties to higher temperatures. Approaches based on condensed phase:gas-phase reactions and condensed-phase:condensed-phase reactions will be discussed.