Chapter 33. High-Temperature Tensile Strength and Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of Norton/TRW NT-154 Silicon Nitride

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Leon Chuck,
  2. Steven M. Goodrich,
  3. Norman L. Hecht and
  4. Dale E. McCullum

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch33

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Chuck, L., Goodrich, S. M., Hecht, N. L. and McCullum, D. E. (1990) High-Temperature Tensile Strength and Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of Norton/TRW NT-154 Silicon Nitride, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313008.ch33

Author Information

  1. University of Dayton Research Institute Dayton, OH 45469

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374924

Online ISBN: 9780470313008

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Keywords:

  • mechanical properties;
  • ceramics;
  • low fracture resistance;
  • structural ceramics;
  • microstructure

Summary

Norton/TRW NT-154 Si3N4 candidate material for advanced heat engines was evaluated in tension from room temperature to 1400°C in air. The results of the tensile strength measurements indicate that the Weibull modulus as a function of temperature is constant, and the strength-limiting defects from the volume are metallic inclusions. From the tensile stress rupture tests, the failure mechanisms are found to be controlled by temperature for a given applied constant stress. At low to moderate temperature, slow crack growth from inclusions is the failure mode. At higher temperatures, two parallel failure modes, crack growth or damage accumulation, dictate the bimodal time-to-failure distribution. Failure analysis showed that all stress rupture specimens failed from volume-initiated defects by transgranular slow crack growth or by coalescence of cavities.