Chapter 11. A Test Method for Tensile Testing Coated Carbon-Carbon and Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Air

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Stuart Starrett

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch11

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Starrett, S. (2008) A Test Method for Tensile Testing Coated Carbon-Carbon and Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Air, in 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch11

Author Information

  1. Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374931

Online ISBN: 9780470313053

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Keywords:

  • environments;
  • ceramic;
  • equipment;
  • temperature;
  • deformation

Summary

Because the tensile test provides the most fundamental mechanical property data and because of the incentive to produce ceramic composites and coated, inhibited carbon-carbon composites for use in oxidizing environments, Southern Research, under Air Force contract, has been working on tensile tests to 3500°F (1927°C). This work has been broken down into test capabilities to ∼2800°F (1538°C) and to 3500°F (1927°C). The distinction is necessary at this time because two different heating methods are being considered. The lower temperature has been achieved by engineering existing technology. The higher temperature has required more creative engineering and may require some “inventions.” The problem is not necessarily heating but combining the heating method with an adequate strain or deformation measuring system.