Chapter 26. Discontinuous ZrO2 Fiber: Precursor Solution Chemistry—Morphology Relationship

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Slvananda S. Jada and
  2. Jon F. Bauer

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch26

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Jada, S. S. and Bauer, J. F. (2008) Discontinuous ZrO2 Fiber: Precursor Solution Chemistry—Morphology Relationship, in 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch26

Author Information

  1. Manville Technical Center, Denver, CO 80217

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374931

Online ISBN: 9780470313053

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • polymeric;
  • viscosity;
  • temperatures;
  • ceramic;
  • polycrystalline

Summary

Discontinuous ZrO2 fibers were produced by a rotary fiberization process using no added polymeric or organic viscosity modifiers to optimize spinning. Water-soluble fiber precursor powders derived from pH-modified solutions were utilized to achieve the requisite control of physical properties of the product. Detailed chemical and structural characterization of the precursor in solution and after sintering temperatures up to 850°C showed a high concentration of Zr-O-Zr bonding and corresponding low residual carbon (acetate) for samples derived from solution pH 6.58. During sintering the objective was to remove organic contaminates at very early stages of precursor fiber pyrolysis to gain control over phase transformation/composition and grain growth. Analysis of resulting spun fibers indicated that pH conditions can result in the formation of low temperature densified polycrystal-line fibers comprised of a uniform distribution of fine-grained ZrO2