Chapter 30. Ceramic Fiber Coating by Gas-Phase and Liquid-Phase Processes

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. T. D. Gulden,
  2. D. A. Hazlebeck,
  3. K. P. Norton and
  4. H. H. Streckert

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch30

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Gulden, T. D., Hazlebeck, D. A., Norton, K. P. and Streckert, H. H. (1990) Ceramic Fiber Coating by Gas-Phase and Liquid-Phase Processes, in 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch30

Author Information

  1. General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92138–5608

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374931

Online ISBN: 9780470313053

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Keywords:

  • multifilament;
  • temperature;
  • ceramic;
  • thermocouple;
  • isopropoxide

Summary

Fiber coating provides a means of controlling the nature of the fiber-matrix interface in composite materials to ensure that toughness and strength are maintained at high temperature. A number of commercially available ceramic fibers were coated by chemical vapor deposition, sol-gel, and polymer precursor methods. A wide variety of promising coating materials can be deposited uniformly on multifilament tows to form high-quality adherent coatings. In some cases dual coatings have been produced and coatings have been applied to woven fabric in addition to fiber tows.