Chapter 34. Room Temperature Tensile and Fatigue Properties of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Aluminosilicate Glass

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Larry P. Zawada1,
  2. Lawrence M. Butkus1 and
  3. George A. Hartman2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch34

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Zawada, L. P., Butkus, L. M. and Hartman, G. A. (1990) Room Temperature Tensile and Fatigue Properties of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Aluminosilicate Glass, in 14th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313053.ch34

Author Information

  1. 1

    Air Force Materials Laboratory, WRDC/MLLN, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH 45433–6533

  2. 2

    University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park Drive Dayton, OH 45469

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374931

Online ISBN: 9780470313053

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Keywords:

  • microcracking;
  • monotonic;
  • alumimsilicate;
  • hypersonic;
  • moisture

Summary

Matrix microcracking has been identified as an indicator of the onset of damage accumulation in ceramic matrix composites. Stress levels required to produce microcracking in unidirectional and cross-ply laminates of Nicalon™-reinforced aluminosilicate glass were determined during monotonic tension testing. Specimens were then tested in tension-tension fatigue (R = 0.1) at stress levels ranging up to 250% of the matrix microcracking stress level. At high stress levels, the unidirectional specimens exhibited a sharp decrease in elastic modulus during the first 10000 cycles, after which the modulus remained relatively constant until “run-out” occurred at 106 cycles. Similar results were obtained from tests conducted on the cross-ply specimens. It is shown that for this material the fatigue life-limiting stress can be associated with the inelastic stress-strain behavior of those plies having fibers running parallel with the loading axis.