Chapter 10. Evaluation of an Atmosphere-Controlled Belt Furnace for the Sintering of Nitrogen Ceramics

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. R. Heslin,
  2. D. A. Norris,
  3. S. K. Fukuda and
  4. P. H. Crayton

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch10

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Heslin, M. R., Norris, D. A., Fukuda, S. K. and Crayton, P. H. (2008) Evaluation of an Atmosphere-Controlled Belt Furnace for the Sintering of Nitrogen Ceramics, in Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch10

Author Information

  1. New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University Alfred, NY 14802–1296

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374962

Online ISBN: 9780470313107

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Keywords:

  • atmosphere-controlled;
  • sintering of nitrogen;
  • sinterability of nitrogen;
  • aluminum nitride;
  • oxynitride spinel

Summary

A comparative study of the sinterability of nitrogen ceramics was conducted between a continuous belt furnace and a conventional batch furnace. Aluminum nitride, aluminum oxynitride spinel, and silicon nitride samples were fired under similar conditions in each furnace and characterized to determine the feasibility of using a continuous furnace to pressureless sinter these materials. Results reaffirm the necessity of using a powder bed and/or high gas over-pressures to limit decomposition of the Si3N4, with additions of 4 wt% Y2O3 and 4 wt% Al2O3, The shallow powder bed for the A/N samples in the belt furnace was deep enough to prevent significant dissociation of the A/N. There was no difference between the periodic furnace and the continuous furnace for the sintering of ALON. The A/N and ALON seem to be the most promising of the three for continuous processing.