Chapter 14. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Furnace Design and Manufacture

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. B. Shibe and
  2. J. Conybear

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch14

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Shibe, B. and Conybear, J. (1990) Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Furnace Design and Manufacture, in Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch14

Author Information

  1. A bar Ipsen Industries Feasterville, PA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374962

Online ISBN: 9780470313107

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Keywords:

  • CVD;
  • cold-wall vessels;
  • vacuum-pumping system;
  • hot process.;
  • deposition

Summary

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is based on the chemical reaction between a gaseous phase and the heated surface of the substrate. Most CVD processes are continuous-loop processes, which means that the reacting gases are fed into the system, and the by-products of reaction are exhausted out of the system, so it is a continuously flowing gaseous process.

Chemical vapor deposition is differentiated from other types of coating processes in that it is a hot process. Generally, the temperatures of deposition are in the range of 500°–1100°C. CVD systems are used to form very thin layers. The deposits attach themselves to the substrates, nucleate, and grow on the substrates using the surface as a catalyst for the deposition. Many of the CVD coatings which are deposited tend to be either rare-earth oxides, nitrides, or carbides.

CVD is an atmospheric controlled process. Most reduction CVD reactors contain vacuum-pumping systems, and the purpose of the vacuum-pumping system is twofold. First, it is to evacuate the reaction chamber to ensure that there is no oxygen present, so that deposition can occur in a clean environment. The second application would be in low-pressure CVD systems, where, naturally, the vacuum-pumping system would be utilized to maintain a low pressure.

CVD reactions are carried out at elevated temperatures. The CVD system itself can be broken down into five main components: furnace, control system, vacuum-pumping system, scrubbing system, and gas-cooling system.