Chapter 15. Fluid-Bed Furnaces for Ceramic Powder Processing

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. C. W. Miller Jr. and
  2. T. E. Pontacoloni

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch15

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Miller, C. W. and Pontacoloni, T. E. (2008) Fluid-Bed Furnaces for Ceramic Powder Processing, in Ceramic Manufacturing Council - Kilns and Firing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 11, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313107.ch15

Author Information

  1. Centorr Furnaces, Inc. Suncook, NH

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374962

Online ISBN: 9780470313107

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Keywords:

  • fluid-bed;
  • ceramic powder processing;
  • beingjkidized;
  • propagate;
  • contact continually

Summary

The advantages of a fluid-bed furnace are chemistry-based. The particles are exposed completely to the gas that they are being fluidized in. Reactions that are occurring can propagate at a slightly enhanced rate because there are no gases, such as carbon monoxide, retarding the reaction. These particles move very quickly from the bed, rather than having a static bed condition. It helps reduce agglomeration, which can occur when particles in contact continually agitate the particles in a controlled manner. The negatives of the system are that operations are in atmospheric conditions or higher. Higher pressures are also possible, but difficult because the particles are so small.