Chapter 17. Stones: Let's Take a Closer Look

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Terry Fisk

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch17

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Fisk, T. (2008) Stones: Let's Take a Closer Look, in Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch17

Author Information

  1. Corning Incorporated Corning, NY 14831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374986

Online ISBN: 9780470313237

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Keywords:

  • petrography;
  • elimination;
  • devitrification;
  • crystalline substance's;
  • X-ray diffraction

Summary

Loss of product due to “stones” in ware continues to be one of the more common problems facing glass manufacturers today. Petrographic analysis by polarized light microscopy is still the preferred method by which to examine a stone's mineralogical constituents so that its source and mechanism of formation might be identified. In spite of the wide variety of possible stone sources (batch, refractories, contaminants, and devitrification), a listing of the more common mineral phases encountered would number fewer than 30. Glass technologists at manufacturing facilities can learn to readily identify most of the mineral phases; however, the establishment of adequate petrographic facilities is a prerequisite. The needs of a good petrography lab will be examined, with emphasis on fundamental petrographic practices. Also, some real-life case histories will be used to show how stone identification has been used lo pin down sources—the information of real interest to glass producers!