Chapter 20. NOx Control Options for Glass Furnaces

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. George L. Moilanen and
  2. Bauke Van Kalsbeek

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch20

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Moilanen, G. L. and Van Kalsbeek, B. (1991) NOx Control Options for Glass Furnaces, in Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch20

Author Information

  1. Sierra Environmental Engineering, Inc. Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374986

Online ISBN: 9780470313237

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Keywords:

  • categorization;
  • combustion;
  • classifications;
  • mechanism;
  • equilibrium

Summary

This paper presents an overview of NO, emission control options for the glass industry. In general, control options can be classified as process modifications, combustion modifications, and postcombustion (or add-on) equipment. Potential NO,-reducing techniques in the process modification category are generally put in effect or in place for reasons other than NO, control, the NO, control being a “side effect.” In the other two categories are a wide range of potential or candidate options; however, only a limited number have been reduced to proven practice. The vast majority of NOx control options are still in the developmental or early commercialization stage. On a practical level, only modest NO, reductions from combustion modifications of the burner/port arrangement and moderate NO, reductions due to application of noncatalytic ammonia injection have demonstrated the consistent ability to reduce NOx from glass furnaces. After providing a generalized categorization and overview of the range of NOx control options, this paper will spend some lime focusing on the technique currently reduced to practice and the most predictable in its ability to achieve required NOx reduction, namely, noncatalytic ammonia injection. A more in-depth review of this technology and its practical application and limitations is presented. Finally, some useful insight and hardware description of a typical ammonia injection system is provided based on actual design and installation experience.