Chapter 21. Development of a Low NOx Method of Gas Firing

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Glenn C. Neff Sr.1,
  2. M. L. Joshi1,
  3. Marvin E. Tester1 and
  4. Sherry K. Panahi2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch21

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Neff, G. C., Joshi, M. L., Tester, M. E. and Panahi, S. K. (1991) Development of a Low NOx Method of Gas Firing, in Proceedings of the 51st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313237.ch21

Author Information

  1. 1

    Combustion Tec, Inc. Orlando, FL 32808

  2. 2

    Southern California Gas Company Los Angeles, CA 90017

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470374986

Online ISBN: 9780470313237

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Keywords:

  • characteristics;
  • emissions;
  • combustion;
  • luminosity;
  • carbon-hydrogen ratio

Summary

An improved method of gas firing on a glass furnace and reduced NOx emissions is outlined. This technique involves the use of a natural gas “cracker”* for NOx reduction. The cracker method of gas firing takes about 25% of the furnace natural gas consumption through a separate cracker to produce soot particles. This is then reblended with the balance of 75% of gas, producing a “soot-rich” gas mixture. The combustion of soot-rich gas produces flame with increased luminosity and lower peak flame temperature characteristics. It is shown that each 100°F decrease in either peak flame temperature or furnace wall temperature decreased NOx emission by 20–25%. Past, current, and future plans involving the cracker program are discussed. Current experiments on a pilot unit were successful in producing a soot-rich gas mixture with the soot concentration of 0.0025 Ib carbon/ft3 of natural gas supplied as a fuel to the furnace. Strictly on the weight basis, it is expected that approximately 8% of the fuel will form a soot cloud. The emitlance of soot clouds of this concentration is about 0.6 and conform a surface which is more capable of radiating than the gaseous components (H2O and CO2). The highly luminous flame is expected to radiate heat more efficiently, operate at a lower peak temperature, and reduce thermal NOx emissions by 35% or more.