Chapter 35. Computational and Experimental Simulation of 3-D Fracture in Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. W. D. Keat,
  2. M. C. Larson and
  3. M. P. Cleary

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch35

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Keat, W. D., Larson, M. C. and Cleary, M. P. (1991) Computational and Experimental Simulation of 3-D Fracture in Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch35

Author Information

  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375099

Online ISBN: 9780470313831

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Keywords:

  • mechanics;
  • fracture;
  • optimum;
  • bimaterial;
  • magnitudes

Summary

A fully 3-D computational and experimental investigation into the mechanics of toughening a brittle matrix by incorporating long brittle fibers is described. Computationally, small scale failure mechanisms ahead of a crack are explicitly modeled and merged with a continuum representation of the far field outside the process zone. Particular attention is given to the interfacial decohesion and frictional slipping near the tip of a matrix crack which is impinging upon a fiber. The surface integral and finite element hybrid (SIFEH) method, which employs the principle of superposition to combine the best features of two powerful numerical techniques, provides an extremely flexible and efficient computational platform for modeling linear elastic fractures near material inhomogeneities. This computational simulation is being guided by laboratory experiments. Crack growth observations made on a model (micro-) structure comprising a glass rod embedded in a cement matrix show the toughening mechanisms of crack pinning and crack bridging in operation. This combined experimental and numerical program is providing insight into optimal combinations of the key parameters (e.g., residual stresses at interface, friction coefficient, strength of fibers) to maximize toughness.