Chapter 36. A Detailed Look at Microfailure Processes in a Brittle Matrix Fiber Composite

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. T. Kobayashi,
  2. D. A. Shockey and
  3. S. M. Johnson

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch36

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Kobayashi, T., Shockey, D. A. and Johnson, S. M. (1991) A Detailed Look at Microfailure Processes in a Brittle Matrix Fiber Composite, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch36

Author Information

  1. SRI International Menlo Park, CA 94025–3493

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375099

Online ISBN: 9780470313831

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Keywords:

  • topography;
  • microscopic;
  • intermetallic;
  • microcrack;
  • microfractures

Summary

FRASTA (fracture surface topography analysis), a newly developed fractographic technique that shows how a crack front interacts with microstructural features, is described and applied to a continuous fiber-reinforcd intermetallic matrix composite. The fracture surfaces of a tensile specimen were examined and their topographies quantified. The fracture process was reconstructed in microscopic detail by comparing the conjugate topographic features at various relative displacements using FRASTA. The results show the sequence of microfailure events occurring in the matrix, in the fiber, at the fiber/matrix interface, and in the fiber core, and hence they provide information useful for developing composite materials that promise to be more resistant to failure.