Chapter 45. Dynamic Fatigue Property of Silicon Carbide Whisker-Reinforced Silicon Nitride

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Sung R. Cho1,
  2. Jonathan A. Salem2 and
  3. John P. Gyekenyesi2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch45

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Cho, S. R., Salem, J. A. and Gyekenyesi, J. P. (1991) Dynamic Fatigue Property of Silicon Carbide Whisker-Reinforced Silicon Nitride, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch45

Author Information

  1. 1

    Cleveland State University Cleveland, OH 44115

  2. 2

    NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375099

Online ISBN: 9780470313831

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • tempemture;
  • materials;
  • monolithic;
  • environment;
  • microhardness

Summary

The dynamic fatigue behavior of 30 vol% SiC whisker-reinforced silicon nitride was determined in flexure as a function of temperature from 1100° to 1300°C in an air environment. The fatigue susceptibility parameter n decreased from 88.1 to 20.1 with increasing temperature from 1100° to 1300°C. A transition in the dynamic fatigue curve occurred at a lowest stressing rate of 2 MPa/min at a temperature of 1300°C, resulting in a considerably lower value of n = 5.8. This transition was primarily due to creep that was enhanced by a combination of high temperature and very slow deformation rate. The fatigue resistance of natural flaws at 1100°C was found to be greater than that of artificial flaws produced by indentation.