Chapter 49. Acoustic Emission Characterization of the Fracture Mechanisms of a Glass-Matrix Composite

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. O. Chen,
  2. P. Karandikar,
  3. N. Takeda,
  4. T. Kishi,
  5. W. Tredway and
  6. K. Prewo

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch49

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Chen, O., Karandikar, P., Takeda, N., Kishi, T., Tredway, W. and Prewo, K. (2008) Acoustic Emission Characterization of the Fracture Mechanisms of a Glass-Matrix Composite, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch49

Author Information

  1. RCAST The University of Tokyo Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375099

Online ISBN: 9780470313831

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Keywords:

  • mechanical;
  • macroscopic;
  • ceramic;
  • fibers;
  • microcracks

Summary

Acoustic emission (AE) analyses have been performed on a high compliance, high failure strain randomly oriented carbon-reinforced glass matrix composite. The composite exhibits a unique nonlinear stress-strain behavior with high failure strain during both uniaxial tensile and flexural testing. The extensive matrix cracking of this material during loading provides an excellent opportunity to study the fracture mechanism. In this study, two types of composites using similar constituents but different processing procedures resulting in different mechanical behavior were studied. This study concentrates on monitoring damage initiation and damage progression during tensile and flexural testing using acoustic emission sensors. Detailed examination of AE characterization, including cumulative AE events, event occurrence and its rate as a function of load, and amplitude distribution histograms of events at different load levels, reveals different emission activities during tensile and flexural loading conditions, indicating different fracture patterns. The examination of amplitude distributions at various loads revealed that the method is sensitive enough to distinguish various fracture processes.