Chapter 6. High Temperature Continuous Sintered SiC Fiber for Composite Applications

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. F. Frechette,
  2. B. Dover,
  3. V. Venkateswaran and
  4. J. Kim

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch6

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Frechette, F., Dover, B., Venkateswaran, V. and Kim, J. (1991) High Temperature Continuous Sintered SiC Fiber for Composite Applications, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313831.ch6

Author Information

  1. The Carborundum Company Technology Division Niagara Falls, NY 14302

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375099

Online ISBN: 9780470313831

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • methodology;
  • thermal;
  • submicron;
  • diameters;
  • polymer

Summary

A process for producing high temperature sintered SiC fibers is described. This process, consisting of green ceramic fiber forming and continuous sintering, has the potential for cost-effective scale-up. Fiberization of a high volume fraction of submicron SiC powder in a polymer to produce a controlled diameter fiber is possible using conventional melt spinning techniques. Initially green fibers were sintered in a batch mode. A methodology is described to enhance fiber strength based on a systematic identification of flaws and the processing step where they are likely introduced followed by corrective action aimed at their elimination. Recent advances in green fiber handling have made it possible to sinter continuously. Continuous sintering is allowed to proceed at significantly higher rates than batch sintering because use is made of the fibers' high surface area-to-volume ratio. The properties of sintered fibers such as tensile strength, thermal stability, and creep are described.