Chapter 10. High-Temperature Creep of Some Single Crystal Oxides

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. G. S. Ccorman

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313848.ch10

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Ccorman, G. S. (1991) High-Temperature Creep of Some Single Crystal Oxides, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313848.ch10

Author Information

  1. General Electric Company Corporate Research and Development Schenectady, NY 12301

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375105

Online ISBN: 9780470313848

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Keywords:

  • alumina;
  • zirconia;
  • refractory;
  • crystallographic;
  • atmospheres

Summary

The compressive creep behavior of single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia, thoria, yttrium aluminum garnet, beryllia, and alumina were evaluated. Steady state creep rate data for these materials are presented for several orientations. The creep behaviors of the alumina and, particularly, beryllia were dominated by very strong anisotropy, caused by easy activation of basal slip. Yttria-stablilized zirconia and thoria exhibited relatively high creep rates despite their high melting points and low diffusivities. Of the materials studied, yttrium aluminum garnet displayed the best creep resistance (low creep rates and low anisotropy), with creep rates lower than even c-axis alumina. Specific creep mechanisms could not be determined; however, dislocation climb limited by cation diffusion appears to be a likely mechanism for the yttria-stabilized zirconia and yttrium aluminum garnet.