Chapter 25. Improved Composite Powder Fabrication

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Jacob J. Stiglich,
  2. Andrew J. Sherman,
  3. Brian E. Williams and
  4. Richard B. Kaplan

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313848.ch25

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Stiglich, J. J., Sherman, A. J., Williams, B. E. and Kaplan, R. B. (1991) Improved Composite Powder Fabrication, in Proceedings of the 15th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 12, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313848.ch25

Author Information

  1. Ultramet Pacoima, CA 91331

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375105

Online ISBN: 9780470313848

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Keywords:

  • isostatic;
  • metallurgy;
  • technology;
  • homogeneous;
  • microstructures

Summary

Recent development work at Ultramet has led to renewed interest in the use of fluidized-bed particle coating technology for the fabrication of improved ceramic, metal, and composite powders. Using fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology, multiphase powders with sintering aids, liquid metal binders, bond coats, ceramics, and/or metals can be applied uniformly over particle surfaces, resulting in 100% dispersions of second phase materials. Precise control over concentration and morphology results in superior powder properties and allows the fabrication of composites through plasma spray, injection molding, and extrusion without segregation of constituents. The combination of these advanced powders and proper consolidation techniques can give precise control over grain boundary properties, reduce defect populations, and allow more rapid and cost-efficient consolidation.