Chapter 15. A Message from the Government…Get the Lead Out!

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Juanell N. Boyd

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch15

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Boyd, J. N. (1994) A Message from the Government…Get the Lead Out!, in Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch15

Author Information

  1. Corning Incorporated Corning, NY 14831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375136

Online ISBN: 9780470313923

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Keywords:

  • interpretation;
  • biological effects;
  • volatilized;
  • contaminated;
  • ingestion

Summary

All branches and levels of government are concerned about potentially toxic materials in the environment. Adverse health effects of each of the following materials will be summarized, and government initiatives relevant to the glass industry will be discussed.

Lead: The concern about lead has been precipitated by recent medical findings indicating that intake levels formerly believed to be safe are associated with subtle but lasting adverse health effects. These findings have stimulated a great deal of media attention and numerous government initiatives aimed at reducing exposures.

Arsenic: Both environmental emissions and workplace exposures have been stringently controlled for a number of years. There appears to be neither a medical need nor public pressure to change the regulations, but there is considerable public pressure for rigorous interpretation and stringent enforcement of all environmental protection regulations.

Cadmium and Chromium: Although these materials are used less widely in the glass industry than lead and arsenic, government initiatives related to these materials may impact some segments of the industry.