Chapter 17. Technical and Cost Implications of Glass Container Recycling from the Perspective of a Local Community Processing Facility

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. M. R. Lewis1 and
  2. T. A. Newell2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch17

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Lewis, M. R. and Newell, T. A. (1994) Technical and Cost Implications of Glass Container Recycling from the Perspective of a Local Community Processing Facility, in Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch17

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 and Institute for Local Self-Reliance Washington, DC 20009

  2. 2

    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375136

Online ISBN: 9780470313923

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Keywords:

  • contamination;
  • curbside program;
  • variation;
  • assumptions;
  • flexibility

Summary

Costs incurred by a community in the collection and processing of glass containers are discussed in this paper. Some glass container statistics obtained from a local recycling center are presented as a basis for developing cost information. Collection costs are discussed based on the type of collection program used. Processing costs associated with color sorting, contamination, and shipping are then discussed. Curbside and commercial collection programs are generally dominated by collection costs while dropoff collection programs have relatively low collection and processing costs. Incorporating more materials into recycling programs generally improves the cost efficiency of any given material.