Chapter 5. Glass Furnace Applications of SNCR NOx Control Technology: Comparison of Predicted and Actual Performance

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. George L. Moilanen,
  2. B. Van Kalsbeek and
  3. Anne McQueen

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch5

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Moilanen, G. L., Van Kalsbeek, B. and McQueen, A. (1994) Glass Furnace Applications of SNCR NOx Control Technology: Comparison of Predicted and Actual Performance, in Proceedings of the 52nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313923.ch5

Author Information

  1. Sierra Environmental Engineering, Inc. Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375136

Online ISBN: 9780470313923

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Keywords:

  • combustion;
  • stoichiometry;
  • noncatalytic;
  • postcombustion;
  • modifications

Summary

Ammonia injection for selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) NOx control (Exxon's Thermal DeNOx process) has been applied to over 100 boilers, heaters, and furnaces burning a variety of fuels. Recently, ammonia injection for noncatalytic NOx reduction has been successfully applied to several gas-fired glass furnaces in California. In comparison to process and combustion modifications, postcombustion NOx control technologies such as Thermal DeNOx have the advantage of being simpler and less costly to implement. In this presentation, both the theoretical aspects and the practical aspects of Thermal DeNOx installations will be examined. First, the design criteria for Thermal DeNOx installations will be discussed, including temperature, residence time, reagent stoichiometry, and injector location requirements. Examples will be provided of how, based on these design criteria, a system performance level, in terms of percent NO, reduction and ppm NH3 slip, can be predicted. Second, a procedure for field optimization of Thermal DeNOx installations will be outlined. A comparison of predicted and actual (after optimization) performance in glass furnace applications will be presented. This practical experience has shown that, through careful manipulation of process variables, system performance levels considerably in excess of those predicted can be obtained.