Chapter 26. Fiber Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. H. W. Carpenter and
  2. J. W. Bohlen

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch26

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Carpenter, H. W. and Bohlen, J. W. (1994) Fiber Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch26

Author Information

  1. Northrop B-2 Division, Pico Rivera, CA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375174

Online ISBN: 9780470313954

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Keywords:

  • oxidation;
  • temperatures;
  • materials;
  • pyrolytic;
  • composition

Summary

Two fiber coating concepts for ceramic matrix composites were successfully demonstrated in a preliminary study. These coatings were designed to promote toughness in composites and resist oxidation. The concepts were (1) thin, multiple unbonded layers, and (2) a single porous layer that provided low interfacial strengths between the fiber and matrix. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC and sol-gel derived oxides were used to produce the fiber coatings. Specimens consisted of a single coated monofilament fiber and a sheath of CVD SiC to represent the matrix. Results from flexure tests showed that matrix cracks were deflected and that fibers debonded the same as in specimens made using carbon-coated fibers. Crack deflection and fiber debonding were also evident after exposure in air at elevated temperatures.