Chapter 43. Failure Behavior of a 2-D Woven Sic Fiber/Sic Matrix Composite at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S. V. Nair and
  2. Yu-Lin Wang

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch43

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Nair, S. V. and Wang, Y.-L. (1994) Failure Behavior of a 2-D Woven Sic Fiber/Sic Matrix Composite at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch43

Author Information

  1. Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375174

Online ISBN: 9780470313954

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Keywords:

  • microcracking;
  • microscope;
  • temperature;
  • mechanisms;
  • component

Summary

The failure behavior of a 2-D woven SiC fiber/SiC matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperatures was studied by characterizing the R-curve behavior at ambient temperature and at 1200°C using compact tension fracture mechanics specimens. A rising R-curve behavior was observed at ambient temperature caused by fiber bridging and microcracking in the crack wake. Significant toughening was also generated by microcracking in the crack front zone. The R-curve effect at ambient temperature was substantially reduced at 1200°C as a result of degradation of the Nicalon fibers. Delamination crack growth was observed at 1200° indicative of a weakened fiber/matrix interface. Toughening at elevated temperature appears to result from a combination of crack branching and microcracking.