Chapter 49. Directed Metal Oxidation Analysis of Al-Cu-Mg, Al-Ni-Mg and Al-Si-Mg Alloy Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Subhash C Khatri and
  2. Michael J Koczak

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch49

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Khatri, S. C. and Koczak, M. J. (2008) Directed Metal Oxidation Analysis of Al-Cu-Mg, Al-Ni-Mg and Al-Si-Mg Alloy Composites, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313954.ch49

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 Tongshik Chou and Yutaka Kagawa, 7–22–1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106, University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science, Tokyo, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375174

Online ISBN: 9780470313954

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Keywords:

  • aluminum;
  • composite;
  • temperature;
  • gaseous;
  • optimum

Summary

Directed melt oxidation (DMO) is an attractive process for fabrication of dense, near net shaped ceramic/metal materials. Optimum processing conditions, along with suitable filler material enable tailoring the composite properties to desired requirements. In this study, ceramic-metal composites were fabricated by directed oxidation of various aluminum alloys at temperatures ranging from 1373–1673 K. Various Al-Si-Mg, Al-Cu-Mg and Al-Ni-Mg alloys were processed. It is anticipated that Al2O3lAl-Ni and Al2O3lAl-Cu systems may be more suitable for high temperature applications. Significant growth rates were obtained between 1423 and 1623 K. The maximum growth rates were obtained at temperatures between 1523 and 1598 K. The conversion of aluminum to alumina was analyzed by optical, electron microscopy, X-ray and EPMA techniques and the results were consistent with the growth rate measurements and phase relationships. Microstructural studies revealed growth of finer interconnected Al2O3lAl-M microstructure if silicon was substituted by copper or nickel. In addition, the composites were also characterized optically for porosity which was always found to be less than 3%, with higher ceramic contents being produced at elevated processing temperatures.