Chapter 51. Cavitation in Thick Joints: A Special Case

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. H. O'Brien

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch51

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

O'Brien, M. H. (1994) Cavitation in Thick Joints: A Special Case, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch51

Author Information

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory EG&G Idaho, Inc., P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415–2218

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375198

Online ISBN: 9780470313978

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Keywords:

  • stressing;
  • ceramic material;
  • determination;
  • normalized;
  • analytical solution

Summary

The cavitation-controlled time-to-failure of thick oxynitride-glass-filled silicon nitride joints is independent of the joint thickness. Failure occurs along one joint boundary or the other, due to cavity coalescence. The separation distance between cavity nuclei is less than or equal to the thickness in these joints. According to classical thin adhesive cavitation models, the time-to-failure is proportional to a power of the ratio of cavity separation distance to adhesive thickness (YS)”. A modification of the thin adhesive model is presented to accommodate the thick joint special case.

Fractography indicates that secondary cavity growth may contribute to the behavior of thinner joints. Uniform (normal) cavity growth predominates in thicker samples, where ζ/δ is significantly less than one. As the ratio ζ/δ approaches one, a secondary (discontinuous) cavity growth phenomenon is seen. It is proposed that normal cavity growth is inhibited by boundary drag in thinner joints, promoting secondary growth.