Chapter 56. Processing of Mullite Using Microemulsion Technology

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Gertrude Klassen and
  2. Gary Fischman

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch56

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Klassen, G. and Fischman, G. (1994) Processing of Mullite Using Microemulsion Technology, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch56

Author Information

  1. NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375198

Online ISBN: 9780470313978

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Keywords:

  • wavelength;
  • potential;
  • thermodynamically;
  • sodium;
  • aluminum

Summary

Microemulsions, while prevalent in chemistry, have not been widely used in ceramics. They have advantages as a chemical processing technique in that fine, pure powder may be produced inexpensively. This study outlines a method for producing mullite via a microemulsion. The successful production of mullite however is still being researched. Problems encountered with the reativity of the aluminum ion in the water phase prevented mullite from being produced. Solutions to this problem will be discussed.