Chapter 6. SiC Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Si3N4 by Infiltration and Reaction Bonding

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Jesper Brandt1,
  2. Kent Rundgren1,
  3. Robert Pompe1,
  4. Håkan Swan2,
  5. Colette O'Meara2,
  6. Robert Lundberg3 and
  7. Lars Pejryd3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch6

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Brandt, J., Rundgren, K., Pompe, R., Swan, H., O'Meara, C., Lundberg, R. and Pejryd, L. (1994) SiC Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Si3N4 by Infiltration and Reaction Bonding, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch6

Author Information

  1. 1

    Swedish Ceramic Institute, Box 5403, S-402 29 Gilteborg, Sweden

  2. 2

    , Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Goteborg, Sweden

  3. 3

    Volvo Flygmotor AB, S-461 81 Trollhattan, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375198

Online ISBN: 9780470313978

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Keywords:

  • fractographic;
  • interpretation;
  • dimension;
  • intensity;
  • generalizations

Summary

Long fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMC) can be manufactured by a number of processing techniques. Unfortunately, there are several limitations to each technique such as long processing time (CVI) or shape limitations (Hot Pressing). A favorable method to produce Sic-fiber-reinforced Si3N4 is to infiltrate/consolidate preforms of SiC fibers with submicron Si/Si3N4 particle slurries and subsequently reaction bond the matrix. To avoid high temperature degradation of the flbers during the reaction bonding process additives lowering the nitridation temperature and time were used. Processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites will be discussed. The results to date show that the fiber bundles are almost completely impregnated by the infiltration technique used. Also, for carbon coated and uncoated SiC fiber CMCs there are noticeable differences in fracture behavior.