Chapter 7. Slurry Infiltration of 3-D Woven Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. S.-M. Sim and
  2. R. J. Kerans

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch7

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Sim, S.-M. and Kerans, R. J. (1994) Slurry Infiltration of 3-D Woven Composites, in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 13, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470313978.ch7

Author Information

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division, Wright Laboratory Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433–6533

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375198

Online ISBN: 9780470313978

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Keywords:

  • characterize;
  • transition;
  • interpretation;
  • characterize;
  • densification

Summary

Sol-gel techniques have been used to infiltrate fibrous preforms at room temperature. However, due to large shrinkage during processing, even many infiltration and heat treatment cycles fail to achieve dense composites. Slurries of alumina and silica powders were infiltrated into 3-D woven preforms of mullite based fiber in order to investigate the effects of particle size and size distribution on packing. A well dispersed slurry containing agglomerate-free, submicron-sized particles significantly increased infiltration efficiency and resulted in a high packing density.