Chapter 13. Color in Lead and Lead-Free Glazes II

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Douglas R. Eppler and
  2. Richard A. Eppler

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch13

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Eppler, D. R. and Eppler, R. A. (1993) Color in Lead and Lead-Free Glazes II, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch13

Author Information

  1. Eppler Associates Cheshire, CT 06410

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • lead oxide;
  • zirconia vanadium yellows;
  • tin vanadium yellows;
  • zinc oxide free glazes;
  • spectrophotometer

Summary

There are several possible changes to the color of a glaze which must be allowed for in changing the lead content of that glaze. A number of pigments are attacked by lead oxide in the glaze. The solubility of most pigments and opacifiers increases with the increase of lead content in the glaze. Hence, a few pigments can be used only in lead-free or opacified low-lead glazes. On the other hand, the presence of lead oxide in a glaze usually improves its intrinsic clarity and increases its gloss. Solubility differences when changing lead oxide content are compensated for by changes in the colorant concentration. Opacity differences can be treated likewise in opacified glazes. Differences in gloss are difficult to eliminate.