Chapter 16. The Effect of Zircon Dissolution and Reprecipitation on the Color Development of Glazes

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Robert P. Blonski

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch16

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Blonski, R. P. (1993) The Effect of Zircon Dissolution and Reprecipitation on the Color Development of Glazes, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch16

Author Information

  1. Ferro Corporation Cleveland, OH 44105

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • kubelka munk theory;
  • color development of glazes;
  • optical techniques;
  • zirconium silicate;
  • x ray diffraction techniques

Summary

The dissolution/precipitation behavior of a praseodymium-doped zircon pigment in a fritted cone 01 and a raw cone 10 glaze was investigated using XRD, SEM, and optical techniques. It was found in the fritted cone 01 system studied that the pigment was stable and that all of the zirconia that is originally contained in the frit can be found as zircon in the fired glaze. In the cone 10 system studied, a significant amount of dissolution was measured. It was also found that the surface layer of the glaze became enriched with zircon, especially in the cone 10 system. Since no dissolution occurs in the fritted glaze, higher chroma colors can be obtained by replacing some or all of the zircon opacifier normally used in the glaze with zircon pigments of similar particle size.