Chapter 28. Optimized Processing of Advanced Ceramics: A Case Study in Slip Casting Y-TZP

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Michael J. Readey

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch28

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Readey, M. J. (1993) Optimized Processing of Advanced Ceramics: A Case Study in Slip Casting Y-TZP, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch28

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • slip casting;
  • zirconia ceramics;
  • silicon nitride;
  • ceramic cutting tools;
  • yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia plycrystalline

Summary

Optimizing the manufacturing process often implies minimizing the variability in the finished product. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that defining the optimum processing conditions for ceramics can be greatly simplified when the data can be statistically reduced to a simple, graphic format. Optimizing the slip casting of Y-TZP is used as an example. The viscosity of a Y-TZP slip was systematically investigated as a function of pH and deflocculant content. The results are presented in three-dimensional surface plots, which clearly show the interrelationships between variables. The data are subsequently reduced into two-dimensional, isoviscosity contour plots. The optimum combination of variables is then determined from regions demonstrating “process-tolerant” viscosity behavior, whereby the slip viscosity is relatively insensitive to large changes in processing conditions.