Chapter 30. Total Cost Approach for Ceramic Component Development

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. K. Subramanian and
  2. P. D. Redington

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch30

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Subramanian, K. and Redington, P. D. (1993) Total Cost Approach for Ceramic Component Development, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch30

Author Information

  1. Norton Company Worcester, MA 01606

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • ceramic components;
  • small production volume;
  • ceramic processing;
  • ceramic component;
  • cost of finishing process

Summary

Interdisciplinary effort between design engineers, ceramists, manufacturing engineers, and machining technologists is critical to achieve commercially viable ceramic components. Such an interactive approach permits changes in individual process steps, with an overall objective of increasing throughput or yield of the entire manufacturing effort. The total cost based on such global optimization is far lower than optimization of individual process steps, one process at a time. This approach to achieve minimum total cost per part is described, with some guidelines drawn based on recent experiences, in the development of ceramic components. Such total cost approach is critical for early commercialization of ceramic components.