Chapter 43. Solution Release of Lead from Incinerator Slags– State of the Art

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Denis A. Brosnan

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch43

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Brosnan, D. A. (1993) Solution Release of Lead from Incinerator Slags– State of the Art, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch43

Author Information

  1. The Center for Engineering Ceramic Manufacturing Clemson University Clemson, SC 29634

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • recrystallization technique;
  • combustion chamber;
  • glass melting technology;
  • slag chemistry;
  • fiberglass filter

Summary

Incinerator slags are complex mixtures of oxide residuals, metal salts, and other substances such as residual metallic materials and carbonaceous residues. The term “slag” may be applied both to residues from the primary combustion chamber of an incinerator, which may range from partially vitrified to highly vitrified, and to residues from the secondary combustion chamber, which are usually highly vitrified. Slags from hazardous waste incinerators contain teachable metals including lead; these slags must be disposed of using methods in compliance with federal and state regulations. Since lead is an element of known toxicity with respect to human health, methods to render lead less teachable in ground water are of great interest to society.

Vitrification of incinerator slags is an effective means of achieving very low leaching of regulated metals, including lead. The technology of vitrification is complex, reflecting the complexity of the composition of the slags. Minimal vitrification temperatures and times were found to achieve minimal lead leaching using the TCLP test as an index of leaching potential It is essential that metallic phases and metal salt species are removed from the oxide slags in order to achieve minimal leaching. Preliminary experiments with recrystallized incinerator slags show that the recrystallization technique may yield altered slags with even lower leaching potential than vitrified slags.