Chapter 8. Microwave Drying of Electrical Porcelain: A Feasibility Study

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Walter A. Hendrix1 and
  2. Tom Martin2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch8

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2

How to Cite

Hendrix, W. A. and Martin, T. (1993) Microwave Drying of Electrical Porcelain: A Feasibility Study, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 94th Annual Meeting and the 1992 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 1/2 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314050.ch8

Author Information

  1. 1

    microGas Corporation Bellevue, WA 98004

  2. 2

    Lapp Insulator Company LeRoy, NY 14482

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375235

Online ISBN: 9780470314050

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Keywords:

  • microwave energy;
  • rate limiting factors;
  • dryer technology;
  • microwave heating;
  • hand held instruments

Summary

The technical feasibility of using microwave energy in combination with convection heating to enhance drying rates for electrical porcelain bodies has been experimentally investigated. In preliminary studies, drying times for solid and cavity core bodies were reduced by 80-90% using various levels of microwave energy along with a range of convection conditions. Predictions based on this work indicate the possibility of further reduction in drying times through optimization of microwave and convection parameters. Furthermore, implementation of this new drying process would greatly impact the porcelain electrical insulator manufacturing process, reducing energy consumption, in-process inventory, factory space, and, very possibly, labor requirements and product losses.