Chapter 23. An Assessment of Optical/Pneumatic Techniques to Automatically Remove Ceramic Contaminants from Cullet

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr
  1. Robert De Saro

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314098.ch23

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 53nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 3/4

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 53nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 3/4

How to Cite

Saro, R. D. (1993) An Assessment of Optical/Pneumatic Techniques to Automatically Remove Ceramic Contaminants from Cullet, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 53nd Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 3/4 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314098.ch23

Author Information

  1. Energy Research Co. Acton, MA 01720

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375242

Online ISBN: 9780470314098

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Keywords:

  • recycled;
  • fuel consumption;
  • inclusion;
  • ceramic;
  • installation

Summary

Container glass manufacturers are increasing their recycled glass use to historically high levels by both the burgeoning availability of returned bottles and legislative pressure. Increased glass recycling is a sound environmental policy since it leads to reduced fuel consumption, increased production, reduced feedstock costs, and reduced emissions for the container manufacturers themselves. Ceramic contaminants, however, must be removed from the recycled glass since they emerge from the forming process as a solid inclusion in the finished bottle, causing its rejection during quality control and thus reducing the plant's production. This is the single biggest obstacle to increasing glass recycling

Optical techniques have been selected as the most suitable near-term technology to remove ceramics. In this scheme, infrared light is passed through the glass and is detected by photodiodes. A ceramic contaminant is opaque to infrared and will shadow one or more of the detectors. This, in turn, triggers a jet of air that blows out the offending ceramic.

This paper presents the results of an engineering and experimental study to qualify innovative optical technologies to achieve ceramic separation. The initial step involved contacting 56 companies and conducting a detailed review of six companies that offered ceramic detection equipment. In addition eight European glass recycler and container plant end-users of this equipment were visited. During the first phase of this work, Owens-Brockway provided glass expertise that guided the equipment selection.

Experimental studies were conducted on two models and resulted in tested separation as follows.

One model has been installed at RRT, a glass recycler providing furnaceready cullet to Owens-Brockway. Data from the installation will be reported

Additionally, laboratory and field testing of a nonferrous metal separator with a low glass loss is discussed