Chapter 15. A Comparison of Single and Multi-Fiber Pushout Techniques

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. D. Jero1,
  2. T. A. Parthasarathy2 and
  3. R. J. Kerans1

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch15

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Jero, P. D., Parthasarathy, T. A. and Kerans, R. J. (1993) A Comparison of Single and Multi-Fiber Pushout Techniques, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate, WL/MLLM, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433

  2. 2

    UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, OH 45432

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • multi-fiber;
  • diameter;
  • nanoindentauon;
  • metallurgical;
  • equation

Summary

Single and multi-fiber pushout techniques were used to examine interfacial properties in a Nicalon/glass (Corning 1723) composite. The single fiber pushout test employed a 10 nm diameter flat bottom probe to push individual fibers from a composite slice. The multi-fiber test employed a 100 m̈m diameter flat bottom probe to simultaneously push a group of fibers from a thin sample from which the top 20–30 m̈m of matrix had been removed by chemical etching. The single fiber pushout tests were accomplished without damage to the specimens, however, the multi-fiber tests were accompanied by significant damage to the composite in the form of broken and chipped fibers and cracking within the matrix. Interface properties were calculated using three different types of data analysis. The single fiber tests in general yielded interface properties which seemed to be more consistent with the known nature of the interface and residual stress state. At least for this composite, the single fiber test appears to be superior.