Chapter 35. Predicting Creep Behavior of Silicon Nitride Components Using Finite Element Techniques

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Jonathan A. Wade,
  2. Charles S. White and
  3. Francisco J. Wu

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch35

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Wade, J. A., White, C. S. and Wu, F. J. (1993) Predicting Creep Behavior of Silicon Nitride Components Using Finite Element Techniques, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch35

Author Information

  1. Saint-Gobain/Norton Industrial Ceramics Corporation Northboro Research and Development Center Goddard Road Northboro, MA 01532-1545

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • silicon nitride;
  • deformation;
  • homogeneous;
  • Arrhenius' law;
  • element

Summary

The creep of silicon nitride tensile specimens has been modeled and incorporated into finite element software to predict the behavior of structural components. The experimental results are for the creep deformation of HIPed yttria-doped silicon nitride at temperatures up to 1400°C. Results are for both homogeneous and joined specimens. This experimental database was modeled using two approaches: Arrhenius' law representation of the steady-state phase, and theta projection method representation of both primary and secondary stages. Arrhenius' law has been incorporated into commercial finite element software and used to predict the creep deformation behavior and time to failure for a simulated component represented by a notched tensile specimen.