Chapter 40. High-Temperature Life Prediction of Monolithic Silicon Carbide Heat Exchanger Tubes

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. M. J. Edwards,
  2. J. B. Sandifer,
  3. S. F. Duffy and
  4. T. S. Brown III

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch40

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Edwards, M. J., Sandifer, J. B., Duffy, S. F. and Brown, T. S. (1993) High-Temperature Life Prediction of Monolithic Silicon Carbide Heat Exchanger Tubes, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch40

Author Information

  1. Babcock & Wilcox Alliance, OH

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • structural ceramic;
  • nondestructive;
  • monolithic silicon carbide;
  • component;
  • parameter

Summary

The need for improved performance in high-temperature environments is prompting industry to consider the use of structural ceramic materials in heat exchanger tubes and other high-temperature components. In recognition of this need, the U.S. Department of Energy has supported work for the development of nondestructive methods for evaluating flaws in monolithic ceramic components, and the associated establishment of criteria for the acceptance of flawed components. Under this development of flaw assess-ment criteria, the DOE supported this work on the high-temperature life prediction of monolithic silicon carbide heat exchanger tubes.

The approach to developing the life prediction model combines finite element predictions considering creep behavior, with continuum damage mechanics, and Weibull reliability statistics. ABAQUS is used to predict time-dependent creep response of the component based on experimental creep data. A continuity parameter is then calculated at each time step following continuum damage mechanics methods.1 Finally, Weibull statistics are used with the resulting continuity parameter to predict the reliability at each time step, through the use of the NASA-Lewis computer program CARES.

Very limited data are available to characterize the creep, continuum damage, and reliability behavior of the material. For the life prediction model reported, it is assumed that the material damages isotropically. Directional effects of the damage can be added as material databases improve.