Chapter 44. Designing for Brittle Materials: Accounting for Crack-Face Interaction

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. J. A. M. Boulet

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch44

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Boulet, J. A. M. (1993) Designing for Brittle Materials: Accounting for Crack-Face Interaction, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch44

Author Information

  1. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • structural;
  • statistical;
  • geometries;
  • intensity;
  • influence

Summary

Designing and predicting the life of a structural member made of a brittle material usually involves the application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) in conjunction with a statistical theory of failure. Because cracks that are closed in the unstressed state are not likely to open much (relative to the opening of cracks in a ductile material) before fast fracture begins, the crack geometry at fracture may not resemble the simple geometries usually assumed for mathematical convenience in LEFM. The influence of irregular geometry on crack-front stress intensity factors is explored through linear elastic analysis of a variety of nonplanar cracks. Of special interest are nearly planar (bumpy) cracks. Numerical analyses based on the boundary element method are used to describe the influence of crack-face interaction (protrusion interference) on the crack-front stress fields. The implications of these results for the life prediction process referred to above are discussed.