Chapter 57. Role of Interfacial Gaseous Heat Transfer and Percolation in the Effective Thermal Conductivity of two Uniaxial Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Kimberly Y. Donaldson1,
  2. Hemanshu D. Bhatt1,
  3. D. P. H. Hasselman1,
  4. K. Chyung2 and
  5. M. P. Taylor2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch57

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Donaldson, K. Y., Bhatt, H. D., Hasselman, D. P. H., Chyung, K. and Taylor, M. P. (1993) Role of Interfacial Gaseous Heat Transfer and Percolation in the Effective Thermal Conductivity of two Uniaxial Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch57

Author Information

  1. 1

    Thermophysical Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 USA

  2. 2

    Research and Development, Coming, Inc. Coming, NY 14830 USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • conductivity;
  • atmosphere;
  • thermal conductivity;
  • theoretically;
  • conductivity

Summary

The transverse thermal conductivity of one carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminoborosilicate glass was found to be a function of the surrounding atmosphere, attributable to the presence of the gas phase in the interfacial gap formed due to the fiber-matrix mismatch in thermal expansion. This effect was absent in another carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminoborosilicate glass containing a higher volume fraction of fibers. For this latter composite, heat transfer was attributed to percolation due to direct fiber-to-fiber contact, with interfacial gaseous heat transfer making little, if any, contribution to the total thermal conductivity.