Chapter 72. Ceramic Matrix Composites Characterization with X-Ray Microtomography and Ultrasonics

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. G. Y. Baaklini1,
  2. R. N. Yancey2 and
  3. S. M. Swickard3

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch72

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8

How to Cite

Baaklini, G. Y., Yancey, R. N. and Swickard, S. M. (1993) Ceramic Matrix Composites Characterization with X-Ray Microtomography and Ultrasonics, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 1 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 7/8 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314180.ch72

Author Information

  1. 1

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, 44135

  2. 2

    Advanced Research and Applications Corporation, Dayton, Ohio, 45431

  3. 3

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375266

Online ISBN: 9780470314180

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Keywords:

  • ultrasonics;
  • tomographic system;
  • capabilities;
  • mechanical behavior;
  • aeronautics

Summary

Capabilities and limitations of x-ray microtomography and ultrasonics in imaging matrix cracking, fiber layup, fiber-matrix debonding, fiber loading, and fiber pullout were defined. The composites consisted of unidirectional one-, three-, five-, and eight-ply specimens, and of a four-ply [0/90]s specimen of silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix. Immersion ultrasonic pulse-echo was used with focussed broadband transducers up to 50 MHz center frequency. The tomographic system resolution was limited to 15 lp/mm (33 micrometers) at 10% modulation. Damage due to tensile failure was optically and radiographically evaluated. Photomicrographs and radiographs were used as references for establishing the microtomography and ultrasonics imaging capabilities. It was found that x-ray microtomography and relatively high frequency ultrasonics are viable nondestructive techniques for monitoring and assessing damage progression and mechanical behavior of newly-developed composites.