Chapter 27. Crack-Particle Interactions in Alumina-Iron Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. A. Trusty and
  2. J. A. Yeomans

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch27

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Trusty, P. A. and Yeomans, J. A. (1993) Crack-Particle Interactions in Alumina-Iron Composites, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch27

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey. GU2 5XH U.K.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375273

Online ISBN: 9780470314234

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Keywords:

  • monolithic;
  • interfacial;
  • fabrication;
  • deformation;
  • isopropanol

Summary

Two morphologically different composites comprising an alumina matrix and 20 vol% iron particles have been fabricated by hot pressing powder blends. The composites differ in the size, shape and distribution of iron particles. The fracture toughness of each composite has been obtained using a double cantilever beam technique inside a scanning electron microscope. Both composites have been found to have a fracture toughness value which is at least twice that of the monolithic alumina. The in situ testing has enabled various toughening mechanisms to be monitored on a microscopic level. The overall fracture toughness value can be related to the sum of the contributions from these mechanisms and hence to the microstructure.