Chapter 36. High Temperature Fracture Mechanisms in Alkoxide-Derived Mullite/ZrO2/SiC-Whisker Composites

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Youren Xu1,
  2. Avigdor Zangvil1 and
  3. Robert Ruh2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch36

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Xu, Y., Zangvil, A. and Ruh, R. (1993) High Temperature Fracture Mechanisms in Alkoxide-Derived Mullite/ZrO2/SiC-Whisker Composites, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch36

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801

  2. 2

    Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson, AFB, OH 45433

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375273

Online ISBN: 9780470314234

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • characterized;
  • intercrystalline;
  • homogeneity;
  • electron microscopy;
  • transgranular

Summary

Room and high temperature (1250°C) mechanical properties of a series of hot-pressed alkoxide-derived mullite-based composites with partially stabilized ZrO2(PSZ) and SiC whiskers (SiCw) have been measured. The morphology of fracture surfaces as well as near-fracture surface microstructures of these materials has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SiCw aided the high temperature strength considerably, but the addition of a MgO or Y2O3stabilizer caused a transition from transcrystalline to intercrystalline fracture at 1250°C and a slow crack growth at low stress levels, resulting in poor high-temperature strength.