Chapter 47. High Temperature Fracture Behavior of SiCf/Si3N4Ceramic Composites in Compression

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. P. D. Miller1,
  2. T. Ertürk2 and
  3. F. G. Gaudette2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch47

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Miller, P. D., Ertürk, T. and Gaudette, F. G. (2008) High Temperature Fracture Behavior of SiCf/Si3N4Ceramic Composites in Compression, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch47

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Massachusetts Lowell Lowell Lowell, Massachusetts 01854

  2. 2

    Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering University of Massachusetts Lowell Lowell Lowell, Massachusetts 01854

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375273

Online ISBN: 9780470314234

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Keywords:

  • microcracks;
  • ceramics;
  • tensile stress;
  • nucleation angles;
  • residual compression

Summary

The compressive fracture behavior of brittle materials is controlled by the presence of various discontinuities, typically randomly oriented microcracks. Secondary tensile cracks, called wing cracks, initiate and grow at the tip of these preexisting discontinuities. Under continued loading wing cracks grow either vertically to cause splitting of the specimen or at an angle to the normal to cause shear faulting. Some experimental observations of the behavior of wing cracks in the presence of fiber like defects in a transparent model material are given. Evidence is presented that the wing cracks are attracted toward interfaces in tensile residual stress. Some experimental observations on the compressive strength and failure modes in SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced Si3N4 ceramic composite at ambient and elevated temperatures are reported.