Chapter 9. Chemical Vapor Infiltration with Microwave Heating

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. D. J. Devlin,
  2. R. P. Currier,
  3. R. S. Barbero and
  4. B. F. Espinoza

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch9

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10

How to Cite

Devlin, D. J., Currier, R. P., Barbero, R. S. and Espinoza, B. F. (2008) Chemical Vapor Infiltration with Microwave Heating, in Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, Part 2 of 2: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 9/10 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314234.ch9

Author Information

  1. Materials Science and Technology Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375273

Online ISBN: 9780470314234

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Keywords:

  • thermal profiles;
  • thermal shock resistance;
  • diffusion;
  • electrommagnetic radiation;
  • microwaves

Summary

The use of microwave energy to heat substrates during chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is described. Both numerical predictions and experimentally observed thermal profiles indicate that steep inverted thermal gradients can be established in fibrous preforms subjected to microwave radiation. When combined with the CVI technique, the inverted gradients can be exploited to promote inside-our densification. Recent microwave assisted CVI results, which focus on silicon based matrix materials, are described. Emphasis is placed on the role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy. Issues central to further process development, such as the effect of interfacial coating on subsequent microwave processing, are discussed.