Chapter 5. Polyethylene Glycol Binders for Advanced Ceramics

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. W. J. Walker Jr.1,
  2. J. S. Reed1 and
  3. S. K. Verma2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314272.ch5

A Collection of Papers on Engineering Aspects of Fabrication of Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 11/12

A Collection of Papers on Engineering Aspects of Fabrication of Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 11/12

How to Cite

Walker, W. J., Reed, J. S. and Verma, S. K. (1993) Polyethylene Glycol Binders for Advanced Ceramics, in A Collection of Papers on Engineering Aspects of Fabrication of Ceramics: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 14, Issue 11/12 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314272.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Alfred University Alfred, NY 14802

  2. 2

    Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics Co. Inc., South Charleston, WV 25303

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375280

Online ISBN: 9780470314272

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Keywords:

  • polyethylene;
  • thermolysis;
  • plasticizers;
  • agglomerates;
  • polymers

Summary

The compaction of spray-dried granules containing polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based binder systems was evaluated and compared to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and PVAA)-based systems. Sintering behavior and green strength were determined. Binder removal from pressed compacts was analyzed by thermal gravimetric analysis. Compacts pressed from granules containing the PEG binder were of higher green density and granules were more completely joined in a higher-density matrix with fewer distinct granules persisting. Densities after sintering in air were highest for compacts containing the more pure PEG or PVAA binder, but the sintering shrinkage was least for the compacts containing PEG. Green strengths for the compacts with PVAA binder were highest, which indicated that both the intrinsic strength of the binder and granule joining were significant. Relative to compacts containing PVA, thermolysis of compacts containing PEG began at a lower temperature and was completed at a lower temperature. For the PEG, thermolysis behavior was significantly retarded using an antioxidant because of the different process of oxidation.