Chapter 30. Which Colors Can and Cannot Be Produced in Ceramic Glazes

  1. John B. Wachtman Jr.
  1. Richard A. Eppler and
  2. Douglas R. Eppler

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch30

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1

How to Cite

Eppler, R. A. and Eppler, D. R. (1994) Which Colors Can and Cannot Be Produced in Ceramic Glazes, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting and the 1993 Fall Meeting of the Materials & Equipment/Whitewares/Manufacturing: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 15, Issue 1 (ed J. B. Wachtman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470314340.ch30

Author Information

  1. Eppler Associates Cheshire, CT 06410

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375297

Online ISBN: 9780470314340

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Keywords:

  • glaze;
  • substantially;
  • obtainable;
  • variation;
  • characteristics

Summary

Essentially all hues of color are obtainable in ceramic glaze systems. However, the purity of color that can be achieved varies substantially. Some colors, such as yellow, are possible at fairly high purity. Others, such as red, are not. The major limiting factor is the purity of color obtainable in a crystal that is stable to the glost firing process.